CHEW DISCO
Chew Disco is a queerfeminist DIY art-activism project and club night based in Liverpool and Manchester.

Hailed as “Liverpool’s best alternative night” by Attitude Magazine and recently described as “I don’t get what’s happening” by several patrons on a hen do, Chew Disco’s flagship club night blends live music, DJs, video and performance art, queerfeminist politics, and adult fun, providing a stage for queer and DIY artists from around the world. Previous guests and collaborators include Vaginal Davis (she said this: http://blog.vaginaldavis.com/2013_11_10_archive.html#233144209846985334), Mykki Blanco, Trash Kit, Queer’d Science, Cheryl, Sister Mantos, Islington Mill, and Homotopia.

Proceeds from their nights and houseparties are given to charities and advocacy organisations working for women and LGBTQs in the non-West.

Its co-founders (Khalil, from Jersey City, and Emma, from Liverpool) like to DJ and once proclaimed themselves “totally the black and mixed-race Cher and Dion of the northwest.”

They are not.
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ln-rs:

Ofuscado
Liñares Original mixmedia art  (2014)
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simplysheerene:

7.15.14||”Hairspectations”
I got so much crap when I cut my hair the second time. All I heard was, “you have such beautiful hair why did you cut it?” When my hair got long enough I got loc extensions. I heard nothing but praise. “Now you look like a woman.” “Don’t ever cut your hair again, you look so much better.” Until I went home and my grandparents gave me crap for having locs.
I am not my hair. And no matter how I choose to style it, I look beautiful. My hair and what I choose to do with it does not define me nor does it concern you. And no matter how I wear it I look divine because of who I am, not what is on my head.
simplysheerene:

7.15.14||”Hairspectations”
I got so much crap when I cut my hair the second time. All I heard was, “you have such beautiful hair why did you cut it?” When my hair got long enough I got loc extensions. I heard nothing but praise. “Now you look like a woman.” “Don’t ever cut your hair again, you look so much better.” Until I went home and my grandparents gave me crap for having locs.
I am not my hair. And no matter how I choose to style it, I look beautiful. My hair and what I choose to do with it does not define me nor does it concern you. And no matter how I wear it I look divine because of who I am, not what is on my head.
simplysheerene:

7.15.14||”Hairspectations”
I got so much crap when I cut my hair the second time. All I heard was, “you have such beautiful hair why did you cut it?” When my hair got long enough I got loc extensions. I heard nothing but praise. “Now you look like a woman.” “Don’t ever cut your hair again, you look so much better.” Until I went home and my grandparents gave me crap for having locs.
I am not my hair. And no matter how I choose to style it, I look beautiful. My hair and what I choose to do with it does not define me nor does it concern you. And no matter how I wear it I look divine because of who I am, not what is on my head.
simplysheerene:

7.15.14||”Hairspectations”
I got so much crap when I cut my hair the second time. All I heard was, “you have such beautiful hair why did you cut it?” When my hair got long enough I got loc extensions. I heard nothing but praise. “Now you look like a woman.” “Don’t ever cut your hair again, you look so much better.” Until I went home and my grandparents gave me crap for having locs.
I am not my hair. And no matter how I choose to style it, I look beautiful. My hair and what I choose to do with it does not define me nor does it concern you. And no matter how I wear it I look divine because of who I am, not what is on my head.
simplysheerene:

7.15.14||”Hairspectations”
I got so much crap when I cut my hair the second time. All I heard was, “you have such beautiful hair why did you cut it?” When my hair got long enough I got loc extensions. I heard nothing but praise. “Now you look like a woman.” “Don’t ever cut your hair again, you look so much better.” Until I went home and my grandparents gave me crap for having locs.
I am not my hair. And no matter how I choose to style it, I look beautiful. My hair and what I choose to do with it does not define me nor does it concern you. And no matter how I wear it I look divine because of who I am, not what is on my head.
simplysheerene:

7.15.14||”Hairspectations”
I got so much crap when I cut my hair the second time. All I heard was, “you have such beautiful hair why did you cut it?” When my hair got long enough I got loc extensions. I heard nothing but praise. “Now you look like a woman.” “Don’t ever cut your hair again, you look so much better.” Until I went home and my grandparents gave me crap for having locs.
I am not my hair. And no matter how I choose to style it, I look beautiful. My hair and what I choose to do with it does not define me nor does it concern you. And no matter how I wear it I look divine because of who I am, not what is on my head.
simplysheerene:

7.15.14||”Hairspectations”
I got so much crap when I cut my hair the second time. All I heard was, “you have such beautiful hair why did you cut it?” When my hair got long enough I got loc extensions. I heard nothing but praise. “Now you look like a woman.” “Don’t ever cut your hair again, you look so much better.” Until I went home and my grandparents gave me crap for having locs.
I am not my hair. And no matter how I choose to style it, I look beautiful. My hair and what I choose to do with it does not define me nor does it concern you. And no matter how I wear it I look divine because of who I am, not what is on my head.
simplysheerene:

7.15.14||”Hairspectations”
I got so much crap when I cut my hair the second time. All I heard was, “you have such beautiful hair why did you cut it?” When my hair got long enough I got loc extensions. I heard nothing but praise. “Now you look like a woman.” “Don’t ever cut your hair again, you look so much better.” Until I went home and my grandparents gave me crap for having locs.
I am not my hair. And no matter how I choose to style it, I look beautiful. My hair and what I choose to do with it does not define me nor does it concern you. And no matter how I wear it I look divine because of who I am, not what is on my head.
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missauset:

nokiabae:

MOKO  // Your Love [x]

Go off
missauset:

nokiabae:

MOKO  // Your Love [x]

Go off
missauset:

nokiabae:

MOKO  // Your Love [x]

Go off
missauset:

nokiabae:

MOKO  // Your Love [x]

Go off
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poeticrican:

grrrls-fighting-back:

"My name is Michael Hunter. I was diagnosed with leukemia in June 2013 & was told on June 11, 2014 that I only have a few months left to live if I can’t find a donor. Please help me with my biological family or a donor match! I was born in Columbus, OH 3/1/1985 at Doctor’s North Hospital and given the name Christopher Brown. Please share"
Michael is a friend, I’m asking that you all take the time to share this. He desperately needs a bone marrow donor and there is very limited number of African American donors. Without a donor Michael is going to die.
Michael was adopted and does not know his birth family. We know he has a half brother but have no information about him.
He does not specifically need an African American Donor but because of all of the things that factor into finding a match (blood type, dna tissue etc.) , someone of similar descent is more likely to be a closer match.
If anyone knows anything about Michael’s birth family or if you would like to see if you are a match, please privately message me. I can put you in touch with him and his caregivers directly!
We hope through spreading awareness we can either find his birth family whom he does not know or find a donor match. Michael lives in the Cincinnati, OH area. Please dont just like this or scroll past. Please share this! You could save his life!

BOOST. Its so hard for Black people to find donors.
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Weegee!!!
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Devon W. Carbado’s essay PRIVILEGE (As published in Black Queer Studies: A Critical Anthology, Duke University Press, 2005)
Devon W. Carbado’s essay PRIVILEGE (As published in Black Queer Studies: A Critical Anthology, Duke University Press, 2005)
Devon W. Carbado’s essay PRIVILEGE (As published in Black Queer Studies: A Critical Anthology, Duke University Press, 2005)
Devon W. Carbado’s essay PRIVILEGE (As published in Black Queer Studies: A Critical Anthology, Duke University Press, 2005)
Devon W. Carbado’s essay PRIVILEGE (As published in Black Queer Studies: A Critical Anthology, Duke University Press, 2005)
Devon W. Carbado’s essay PRIVILEGE (As published in Black Queer Studies: A Critical Anthology, Duke University Press, 2005)
Devon W. Carbado’s essay PRIVILEGE (As published in Black Queer Studies: A Critical Anthology, Duke University Press, 2005)
Devon W. Carbado’s essay PRIVILEGE (As published in Black Queer Studies: A Critical Anthology, Duke University Press, 2005)
Devon W. Carbado’s essay PRIVILEGE (As published in Black Queer Studies: A Critical Anthology, Duke University Press, 2005)
Devon W. Carbado’s essay PRIVILEGE (As published in Black Queer Studies: A Critical Anthology, Duke University Press, 2005)
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Los Cripis (Argentina), with Dog Legs (Brighton), Good Grief (Liverpool) and Dream Soda (Liverpool) LIVE at The Shipping Forecast, Liverpool!!  Thursday 10 July 2014, doors 7:30pm.  
https://www.facebook.com/events/494403954036318/
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Nina Simone and James Baldwin.  Giving me LIFE!
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Tonight: the Return of CHERYL: https://www.facebook.com/events/658526117549662/663060230429584/
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unhistorical:

February 19, 1942: Franklin D. Roosevelt issues Executive Order 9066. 
The order provided for the designation of military areas (to be decided by the Secretary of War and commanders of the U.S. armed forces) from which “any or all persons” could be relocated. No specific ethnic groups or sections of the nation were singled out in the text of the order, but it stated that these new powers would serve as “protection against espionage and against sabotage”. In practice, it resulted in the internment of 120,000 Japanese-Americans, nearly two-thirds of whom were American-born citizens; smaller numbers of German- and Italian-Americans were interned as well, but no ethnic group was targeted by the government to the extent that the Japanese were. 
Virtually every Japanese-American living on the West Coast was interned, while a small fraction of those living in Hawaii - just over a thousand - suffered the same fate. The justification for the executive order was practical; it was believed that many Japanese, Issei and Sansei alike, could not possibly remain loyal to the United States if it went to war with Japan. It was outwardly practical (the Ni’ihau Incident seemed to prove American suspicions), and it was deeply rooted in racial prejudice. Many white farmers were glad to see their Japanese competition uprooted and displaced; several newspapers printed opinion pieces that supported wholeheartedly the internment based on their own personal feelings toward the Japanese; the American public (including even Theodore Geisel/Dr. Seuss) generally supported the move; and the Supreme Court, the ultimate defender and interpreter of the U.S. Constitution, upheld the constitutionality of the executive order in Korematsu v. U.S. (also see: Hirabayashi v. U.S.).  Camps were run by the Wartime Civil Control Administration and the War Relocation Authority; the largest of these by population were Tule Lake and Poston, but the most well-known today is Manzanar. 
Some Japanese-Americans escaped internment by volunteering to serve in the U.S. Army, and many of them served in the famous 442nd Infantry Regiment, a unit that fought in Europe after 1944. Ironically, while many of its members’ families remained interned at home based on widespread racism and suspicions of disloyalty, this all-Japanese unit eventually became the most decorated infantry regiment in the history of the U.S. Army: twenty-one of its members were awarded the Medal of Honor. 
Executive Order 9066 was eventually rescinded in 1976, and surviving Japanese internees received payments and apologies from the U.S. government in the 1990s. But money paid four decades later could not compensate for the time lost in the camps; the businesses, homes, farms, and other property sold last-minute at ridiculously low prices by their owners or vandalized and destroyed in their absence; and the humiliation and disillusionment at having been denounced by their own countrymen and rounded up by their own government. 
Images compiled by The Atlantic
unhistorical:

February 19, 1942: Franklin D. Roosevelt issues Executive Order 9066. 
The order provided for the designation of military areas (to be decided by the Secretary of War and commanders of the U.S. armed forces) from which “any or all persons” could be relocated. No specific ethnic groups or sections of the nation were singled out in the text of the order, but it stated that these new powers would serve as “protection against espionage and against sabotage”. In practice, it resulted in the internment of 120,000 Japanese-Americans, nearly two-thirds of whom were American-born citizens; smaller numbers of German- and Italian-Americans were interned as well, but no ethnic group was targeted by the government to the extent that the Japanese were. 
Virtually every Japanese-American living on the West Coast was interned, while a small fraction of those living in Hawaii - just over a thousand - suffered the same fate. The justification for the executive order was practical; it was believed that many Japanese, Issei and Sansei alike, could not possibly remain loyal to the United States if it went to war with Japan. It was outwardly practical (the Ni’ihau Incident seemed to prove American suspicions), and it was deeply rooted in racial prejudice. Many white farmers were glad to see their Japanese competition uprooted and displaced; several newspapers printed opinion pieces that supported wholeheartedly the internment based on their own personal feelings toward the Japanese; the American public (including even Theodore Geisel/Dr. Seuss) generally supported the move; and the Supreme Court, the ultimate defender and interpreter of the U.S. Constitution, upheld the constitutionality of the executive order in Korematsu v. U.S. (also see: Hirabayashi v. U.S.).  Camps were run by the Wartime Civil Control Administration and the War Relocation Authority; the largest of these by population were Tule Lake and Poston, but the most well-known today is Manzanar. 
Some Japanese-Americans escaped internment by volunteering to serve in the U.S. Army, and many of them served in the famous 442nd Infantry Regiment, a unit that fought in Europe after 1944. Ironically, while many of its members’ families remained interned at home based on widespread racism and suspicions of disloyalty, this all-Japanese unit eventually became the most decorated infantry regiment in the history of the U.S. Army: twenty-one of its members were awarded the Medal of Honor. 
Executive Order 9066 was eventually rescinded in 1976, and surviving Japanese internees received payments and apologies from the U.S. government in the 1990s. But money paid four decades later could not compensate for the time lost in the camps; the businesses, homes, farms, and other property sold last-minute at ridiculously low prices by their owners or vandalized and destroyed in their absence; and the humiliation and disillusionment at having been denounced by their own countrymen and rounded up by their own government. 
Images compiled by The Atlantic
unhistorical:

February 19, 1942: Franklin D. Roosevelt issues Executive Order 9066. 
The order provided for the designation of military areas (to be decided by the Secretary of War and commanders of the U.S. armed forces) from which “any or all persons” could be relocated. No specific ethnic groups or sections of the nation were singled out in the text of the order, but it stated that these new powers would serve as “protection against espionage and against sabotage”. In practice, it resulted in the internment of 120,000 Japanese-Americans, nearly two-thirds of whom were American-born citizens; smaller numbers of German- and Italian-Americans were interned as well, but no ethnic group was targeted by the government to the extent that the Japanese were. 
Virtually every Japanese-American living on the West Coast was interned, while a small fraction of those living in Hawaii - just over a thousand - suffered the same fate. The justification for the executive order was practical; it was believed that many Japanese, Issei and Sansei alike, could not possibly remain loyal to the United States if it went to war with Japan. It was outwardly practical (the Ni’ihau Incident seemed to prove American suspicions), and it was deeply rooted in racial prejudice. Many white farmers were glad to see their Japanese competition uprooted and displaced; several newspapers printed opinion pieces that supported wholeheartedly the internment based on their own personal feelings toward the Japanese; the American public (including even Theodore Geisel/Dr. Seuss) generally supported the move; and the Supreme Court, the ultimate defender and interpreter of the U.S. Constitution, upheld the constitutionality of the executive order in Korematsu v. U.S. (also see: Hirabayashi v. U.S.).  Camps were run by the Wartime Civil Control Administration and the War Relocation Authority; the largest of these by population were Tule Lake and Poston, but the most well-known today is Manzanar. 
Some Japanese-Americans escaped internment by volunteering to serve in the U.S. Army, and many of them served in the famous 442nd Infantry Regiment, a unit that fought in Europe after 1944. Ironically, while many of its members’ families remained interned at home based on widespread racism and suspicions of disloyalty, this all-Japanese unit eventually became the most decorated infantry regiment in the history of the U.S. Army: twenty-one of its members were awarded the Medal of Honor. 
Executive Order 9066 was eventually rescinded in 1976, and surviving Japanese internees received payments and apologies from the U.S. government in the 1990s. But money paid four decades later could not compensate for the time lost in the camps; the businesses, homes, farms, and other property sold last-minute at ridiculously low prices by their owners or vandalized and destroyed in their absence; and the humiliation and disillusionment at having been denounced by their own countrymen and rounded up by their own government. 
Images compiled by The Atlantic
unhistorical:

February 19, 1942: Franklin D. Roosevelt issues Executive Order 9066. 
The order provided for the designation of military areas (to be decided by the Secretary of War and commanders of the U.S. armed forces) from which “any or all persons” could be relocated. No specific ethnic groups or sections of the nation were singled out in the text of the order, but it stated that these new powers would serve as “protection against espionage and against sabotage”. In practice, it resulted in the internment of 120,000 Japanese-Americans, nearly two-thirds of whom were American-born citizens; smaller numbers of German- and Italian-Americans were interned as well, but no ethnic group was targeted by the government to the extent that the Japanese were. 
Virtually every Japanese-American living on the West Coast was interned, while a small fraction of those living in Hawaii - just over a thousand - suffered the same fate. The justification for the executive order was practical; it was believed that many Japanese, Issei and Sansei alike, could not possibly remain loyal to the United States if it went to war with Japan. It was outwardly practical (the Ni’ihau Incident seemed to prove American suspicions), and it was deeply rooted in racial prejudice. Many white farmers were glad to see their Japanese competition uprooted and displaced; several newspapers printed opinion pieces that supported wholeheartedly the internment based on their own personal feelings toward the Japanese; the American public (including even Theodore Geisel/Dr. Seuss) generally supported the move; and the Supreme Court, the ultimate defender and interpreter of the U.S. Constitution, upheld the constitutionality of the executive order in Korematsu v. U.S. (also see: Hirabayashi v. U.S.).  Camps were run by the Wartime Civil Control Administration and the War Relocation Authority; the largest of these by population were Tule Lake and Poston, but the most well-known today is Manzanar. 
Some Japanese-Americans escaped internment by volunteering to serve in the U.S. Army, and many of them served in the famous 442nd Infantry Regiment, a unit that fought in Europe after 1944. Ironically, while many of its members’ families remained interned at home based on widespread racism and suspicions of disloyalty, this all-Japanese unit eventually became the most decorated infantry regiment in the history of the U.S. Army: twenty-one of its members were awarded the Medal of Honor. 
Executive Order 9066 was eventually rescinded in 1976, and surviving Japanese internees received payments and apologies from the U.S. government in the 1990s. But money paid four decades later could not compensate for the time lost in the camps; the businesses, homes, farms, and other property sold last-minute at ridiculously low prices by their owners or vandalized and destroyed in their absence; and the humiliation and disillusionment at having been denounced by their own countrymen and rounded up by their own government. 
Images compiled by The Atlantic
unhistorical:

February 19, 1942: Franklin D. Roosevelt issues Executive Order 9066. 
The order provided for the designation of military areas (to be decided by the Secretary of War and commanders of the U.S. armed forces) from which “any or all persons” could be relocated. No specific ethnic groups or sections of the nation were singled out in the text of the order, but it stated that these new powers would serve as “protection against espionage and against sabotage”. In practice, it resulted in the internment of 120,000 Japanese-Americans, nearly two-thirds of whom were American-born citizens; smaller numbers of German- and Italian-Americans were interned as well, but no ethnic group was targeted by the government to the extent that the Japanese were. 
Virtually every Japanese-American living on the West Coast was interned, while a small fraction of those living in Hawaii - just over a thousand - suffered the same fate. The justification for the executive order was practical; it was believed that many Japanese, Issei and Sansei alike, could not possibly remain loyal to the United States if it went to war with Japan. It was outwardly practical (the Ni’ihau Incident seemed to prove American suspicions), and it was deeply rooted in racial prejudice. Many white farmers were glad to see their Japanese competition uprooted and displaced; several newspapers printed opinion pieces that supported wholeheartedly the internment based on their own personal feelings toward the Japanese; the American public (including even Theodore Geisel/Dr. Seuss) generally supported the move; and the Supreme Court, the ultimate defender and interpreter of the U.S. Constitution, upheld the constitutionality of the executive order in Korematsu v. U.S. (also see: Hirabayashi v. U.S.).  Camps were run by the Wartime Civil Control Administration and the War Relocation Authority; the largest of these by population were Tule Lake and Poston, but the most well-known today is Manzanar. 
Some Japanese-Americans escaped internment by volunteering to serve in the U.S. Army, and many of them served in the famous 442nd Infantry Regiment, a unit that fought in Europe after 1944. Ironically, while many of its members’ families remained interned at home based on widespread racism and suspicions of disloyalty, this all-Japanese unit eventually became the most decorated infantry regiment in the history of the U.S. Army: twenty-one of its members were awarded the Medal of Honor. 
Executive Order 9066 was eventually rescinded in 1976, and surviving Japanese internees received payments and apologies from the U.S. government in the 1990s. But money paid four decades later could not compensate for the time lost in the camps; the businesses, homes, farms, and other property sold last-minute at ridiculously low prices by their owners or vandalized and destroyed in their absence; and the humiliation and disillusionment at having been denounced by their own countrymen and rounded up by their own government. 
Images compiled by The Atlantic
unhistorical:

February 19, 1942: Franklin D. Roosevelt issues Executive Order 9066. 
The order provided for the designation of military areas (to be decided by the Secretary of War and commanders of the U.S. armed forces) from which “any or all persons” could be relocated. No specific ethnic groups or sections of the nation were singled out in the text of the order, but it stated that these new powers would serve as “protection against espionage and against sabotage”. In practice, it resulted in the internment of 120,000 Japanese-Americans, nearly two-thirds of whom were American-born citizens; smaller numbers of German- and Italian-Americans were interned as well, but no ethnic group was targeted by the government to the extent that the Japanese were. 
Virtually every Japanese-American living on the West Coast was interned, while a small fraction of those living in Hawaii - just over a thousand - suffered the same fate. The justification for the executive order was practical; it was believed that many Japanese, Issei and Sansei alike, could not possibly remain loyal to the United States if it went to war with Japan. It was outwardly practical (the Ni’ihau Incident seemed to prove American suspicions), and it was deeply rooted in racial prejudice. Many white farmers were glad to see their Japanese competition uprooted and displaced; several newspapers printed opinion pieces that supported wholeheartedly the internment based on their own personal feelings toward the Japanese; the American public (including even Theodore Geisel/Dr. Seuss) generally supported the move; and the Supreme Court, the ultimate defender and interpreter of the U.S. Constitution, upheld the constitutionality of the executive order in Korematsu v. U.S. (also see: Hirabayashi v. U.S.).  Camps were run by the Wartime Civil Control Administration and the War Relocation Authority; the largest of these by population were Tule Lake and Poston, but the most well-known today is Manzanar. 
Some Japanese-Americans escaped internment by volunteering to serve in the U.S. Army, and many of them served in the famous 442nd Infantry Regiment, a unit that fought in Europe after 1944. Ironically, while many of its members’ families remained interned at home based on widespread racism and suspicions of disloyalty, this all-Japanese unit eventually became the most decorated infantry regiment in the history of the U.S. Army: twenty-one of its members were awarded the Medal of Honor. 
Executive Order 9066 was eventually rescinded in 1976, and surviving Japanese internees received payments and apologies from the U.S. government in the 1990s. But money paid four decades later could not compensate for the time lost in the camps; the businesses, homes, farms, and other property sold last-minute at ridiculously low prices by their owners or vandalized and destroyed in their absence; and the humiliation and disillusionment at having been denounced by their own countrymen and rounded up by their own government. 
Images compiled by The Atlantic
unhistorical:

February 19, 1942: Franklin D. Roosevelt issues Executive Order 9066. 
The order provided for the designation of military areas (to be decided by the Secretary of War and commanders of the U.S. armed forces) from which “any or all persons” could be relocated. No specific ethnic groups or sections of the nation were singled out in the text of the order, but it stated that these new powers would serve as “protection against espionage and against sabotage”. In practice, it resulted in the internment of 120,000 Japanese-Americans, nearly two-thirds of whom were American-born citizens; smaller numbers of German- and Italian-Americans were interned as well, but no ethnic group was targeted by the government to the extent that the Japanese were. 
Virtually every Japanese-American living on the West Coast was interned, while a small fraction of those living in Hawaii - just over a thousand - suffered the same fate. The justification for the executive order was practical; it was believed that many Japanese, Issei and Sansei alike, could not possibly remain loyal to the United States if it went to war with Japan. It was outwardly practical (the Ni’ihau Incident seemed to prove American suspicions), and it was deeply rooted in racial prejudice. Many white farmers were glad to see their Japanese competition uprooted and displaced; several newspapers printed opinion pieces that supported wholeheartedly the internment based on their own personal feelings toward the Japanese; the American public (including even Theodore Geisel/Dr. Seuss) generally supported the move; and the Supreme Court, the ultimate defender and interpreter of the U.S. Constitution, upheld the constitutionality of the executive order in Korematsu v. U.S. (also see: Hirabayashi v. U.S.).  Camps were run by the Wartime Civil Control Administration and the War Relocation Authority; the largest of these by population were Tule Lake and Poston, but the most well-known today is Manzanar. 
Some Japanese-Americans escaped internment by volunteering to serve in the U.S. Army, and many of them served in the famous 442nd Infantry Regiment, a unit that fought in Europe after 1944. Ironically, while many of its members’ families remained interned at home based on widespread racism and suspicions of disloyalty, this all-Japanese unit eventually became the most decorated infantry regiment in the history of the U.S. Army: twenty-one of its members were awarded the Medal of Honor. 
Executive Order 9066 was eventually rescinded in 1976, and surviving Japanese internees received payments and apologies from the U.S. government in the 1990s. But money paid four decades later could not compensate for the time lost in the camps; the businesses, homes, farms, and other property sold last-minute at ridiculously low prices by their owners or vandalized and destroyed in their absence; and the humiliation and disillusionment at having been denounced by their own countrymen and rounded up by their own government. 
Images compiled by The Atlantic
unhistorical:

February 19, 1942: Franklin D. Roosevelt issues Executive Order 9066. 
The order provided for the designation of military areas (to be decided by the Secretary of War and commanders of the U.S. armed forces) from which “any or all persons” could be relocated. No specific ethnic groups or sections of the nation were singled out in the text of the order, but it stated that these new powers would serve as “protection against espionage and against sabotage”. In practice, it resulted in the internment of 120,000 Japanese-Americans, nearly two-thirds of whom were American-born citizens; smaller numbers of German- and Italian-Americans were interned as well, but no ethnic group was targeted by the government to the extent that the Japanese were. 
Virtually every Japanese-American living on the West Coast was interned, while a small fraction of those living in Hawaii - just over a thousand - suffered the same fate. The justification for the executive order was practical; it was believed that many Japanese, Issei and Sansei alike, could not possibly remain loyal to the United States if it went to war with Japan. It was outwardly practical (the Ni’ihau Incident seemed to prove American suspicions), and it was deeply rooted in racial prejudice. Many white farmers were glad to see their Japanese competition uprooted and displaced; several newspapers printed opinion pieces that supported wholeheartedly the internment based on their own personal feelings toward the Japanese; the American public (including even Theodore Geisel/Dr. Seuss) generally supported the move; and the Supreme Court, the ultimate defender and interpreter of the U.S. Constitution, upheld the constitutionality of the executive order in Korematsu v. U.S. (also see: Hirabayashi v. U.S.).  Camps were run by the Wartime Civil Control Administration and the War Relocation Authority; the largest of these by population were Tule Lake and Poston, but the most well-known today is Manzanar. 
Some Japanese-Americans escaped internment by volunteering to serve in the U.S. Army, and many of them served in the famous 442nd Infantry Regiment, a unit that fought in Europe after 1944. Ironically, while many of its members’ families remained interned at home based on widespread racism and suspicions of disloyalty, this all-Japanese unit eventually became the most decorated infantry regiment in the history of the U.S. Army: twenty-one of its members were awarded the Medal of Honor. 
Executive Order 9066 was eventually rescinded in 1976, and surviving Japanese internees received payments and apologies from the U.S. government in the 1990s. But money paid four decades later could not compensate for the time lost in the camps; the businesses, homes, farms, and other property sold last-minute at ridiculously low prices by their owners or vandalized and destroyed in their absence; and the humiliation and disillusionment at having been denounced by their own countrymen and rounded up by their own government. 
Images compiled by The Atlantic
Fruitvale Station's Michael B Jordan: 'African-Americans aren't allowed to be real people'
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fear-is-needless:

precioushenshaw:

"See Yourself As Any Princess" | Art series by Precious Henshaw.
What it’s about: An artistic depiction of several popular, fictional princesses envisioned as Black girls.
Why I did this: Sometime in my teen years, when I was tutoring elementary school children, I overheard two Black girls talking about wanting to be Cinderella for Halloween. Another girl interrupted them and said, “You can’t be Cinderella, because you’re Black!” It bothered me. When my little cousins came along and they began to take interest in princesses, I often wondered how they felt about not looking like some of the popular ones, such as Cinderella and Snow White. Would they play princess happily until someone came and told them that they could never be a certain princess, because they are Black? It’s no secret that when the majority of characters on TV are white, some young Black girls can have a hard time identifying with them without feeling as though they needed to change their appearance in order to look more like them.
This art series is not meant to merely change white characters into ones of color, but rather to encourage my younger girl cousins - and any other young girl I might inspire - to see themselves as any princess they want to be, without feeling the need to change their skin or their hair.
Please look out for this series which is coming to my shop on June 6th.

This is v important because my three year old sister doesn’t think she can be a princess and when I put on fairy tales for her, she always asks for the brown princess (meaning tiana). I showed her this photoset and she could still identify every princess! She was also happy to see them look like her.
fear-is-needless:

precioushenshaw:

"See Yourself As Any Princess" | Art series by Precious Henshaw.
What it’s about: An artistic depiction of several popular, fictional princesses envisioned as Black girls.
Why I did this: Sometime in my teen years, when I was tutoring elementary school children, I overheard two Black girls talking about wanting to be Cinderella for Halloween. Another girl interrupted them and said, “You can’t be Cinderella, because you’re Black!” It bothered me. When my little cousins came along and they began to take interest in princesses, I often wondered how they felt about not looking like some of the popular ones, such as Cinderella and Snow White. Would they play princess happily until someone came and told them that they could never be a certain princess, because they are Black? It’s no secret that when the majority of characters on TV are white, some young Black girls can have a hard time identifying with them without feeling as though they needed to change their appearance in order to look more like them.
This art series is not meant to merely change white characters into ones of color, but rather to encourage my younger girl cousins - and any other young girl I might inspire - to see themselves as any princess they want to be, without feeling the need to change their skin or their hair.
Please look out for this series which is coming to my shop on June 6th.

This is v important because my three year old sister doesn’t think she can be a princess and when I put on fairy tales for her, she always asks for the brown princess (meaning tiana). I showed her this photoset and she could still identify every princess! She was also happy to see them look like her.
fear-is-needless:

precioushenshaw:

"See Yourself As Any Princess" | Art series by Precious Henshaw.
What it’s about: An artistic depiction of several popular, fictional princesses envisioned as Black girls.
Why I did this: Sometime in my teen years, when I was tutoring elementary school children, I overheard two Black girls talking about wanting to be Cinderella for Halloween. Another girl interrupted them and said, “You can’t be Cinderella, because you’re Black!” It bothered me. When my little cousins came along and they began to take interest in princesses, I often wondered how they felt about not looking like some of the popular ones, such as Cinderella and Snow White. Would they play princess happily until someone came and told them that they could never be a certain princess, because they are Black? It’s no secret that when the majority of characters on TV are white, some young Black girls can have a hard time identifying with them without feeling as though they needed to change their appearance in order to look more like them.
This art series is not meant to merely change white characters into ones of color, but rather to encourage my younger girl cousins - and any other young girl I might inspire - to see themselves as any princess they want to be, without feeling the need to change their skin or their hair.
Please look out for this series which is coming to my shop on June 6th.

This is v important because my three year old sister doesn’t think she can be a princess and when I put on fairy tales for her, she always asks for the brown princess (meaning tiana). I showed her this photoset and she could still identify every princess! She was also happy to see them look like her.
fear-is-needless:

precioushenshaw:

"See Yourself As Any Princess" | Art series by Precious Henshaw.
What it’s about: An artistic depiction of several popular, fictional princesses envisioned as Black girls.
Why I did this: Sometime in my teen years, when I was tutoring elementary school children, I overheard two Black girls talking about wanting to be Cinderella for Halloween. Another girl interrupted them and said, “You can’t be Cinderella, because you’re Black!” It bothered me. When my little cousins came along and they began to take interest in princesses, I often wondered how they felt about not looking like some of the popular ones, such as Cinderella and Snow White. Would they play princess happily until someone came and told them that they could never be a certain princess, because they are Black? It’s no secret that when the majority of characters on TV are white, some young Black girls can have a hard time identifying with them without feeling as though they needed to change their appearance in order to look more like them.
This art series is not meant to merely change white characters into ones of color, but rather to encourage my younger girl cousins - and any other young girl I might inspire - to see themselves as any princess they want to be, without feeling the need to change their skin or their hair.
Please look out for this series which is coming to my shop on June 6th.

This is v important because my three year old sister doesn’t think she can be a princess and when I put on fairy tales for her, she always asks for the brown princess (meaning tiana). I showed her this photoset and she could still identify every princess! She was also happy to see them look like her.
fear-is-needless:

precioushenshaw:

"See Yourself As Any Princess" | Art series by Precious Henshaw.
What it’s about: An artistic depiction of several popular, fictional princesses envisioned as Black girls.
Why I did this: Sometime in my teen years, when I was tutoring elementary school children, I overheard two Black girls talking about wanting to be Cinderella for Halloween. Another girl interrupted them and said, “You can’t be Cinderella, because you’re Black!” It bothered me. When my little cousins came along and they began to take interest in princesses, I often wondered how they felt about not looking like some of the popular ones, such as Cinderella and Snow White. Would they play princess happily until someone came and told them that they could never be a certain princess, because they are Black? It’s no secret that when the majority of characters on TV are white, some young Black girls can have a hard time identifying with them without feeling as though they needed to change their appearance in order to look more like them.
This art series is not meant to merely change white characters into ones of color, but rather to encourage my younger girl cousins - and any other young girl I might inspire - to see themselves as any princess they want to be, without feeling the need to change their skin or their hair.
Please look out for this series which is coming to my shop on June 6th.

This is v important because my three year old sister doesn’t think she can be a princess and when I put on fairy tales for her, she always asks for the brown princess (meaning tiana). I showed her this photoset and she could still identify every princess! She was also happy to see them look like her.
fear-is-needless:

precioushenshaw:

"See Yourself As Any Princess" | Art series by Precious Henshaw.
What it’s about: An artistic depiction of several popular, fictional princesses envisioned as Black girls.
Why I did this: Sometime in my teen years, when I was tutoring elementary school children, I overheard two Black girls talking about wanting to be Cinderella for Halloween. Another girl interrupted them and said, “You can’t be Cinderella, because you’re Black!” It bothered me. When my little cousins came along and they began to take interest in princesses, I often wondered how they felt about not looking like some of the popular ones, such as Cinderella and Snow White. Would they play princess happily until someone came and told them that they could never be a certain princess, because they are Black? It’s no secret that when the majority of characters on TV are white, some young Black girls can have a hard time identifying with them without feeling as though they needed to change their appearance in order to look more like them.
This art series is not meant to merely change white characters into ones of color, but rather to encourage my younger girl cousins - and any other young girl I might inspire - to see themselves as any princess they want to be, without feeling the need to change their skin or their hair.
Please look out for this series which is coming to my shop on June 6th.

This is v important because my three year old sister doesn’t think she can be a princess and when I put on fairy tales for her, she always asks for the brown princess (meaning tiana). I showed her this photoset and she could still identify every princess! She was also happy to see them look like her.